thebrainscoop:

#AttenboroughWeek starts April 21st! 

The BBC is celebrating the life and work of Sir David Attenborough all next week with commemorative video releases and encouraging dialogue about his extensive life’s work. I participated in a video retelling my favorite Attenborough moment that was uploaded to EarthUnplugged today. 

Sir David’s documentary legacy has been incredibly influential to me. Watching the Planet Earth series was the first time I ever felt a personal connection to and responsibility for this planet we share. I believe strongly in the power of community, shared knowledge, and the desire to work towards better environmental health, and we can do that if we choose to embody the respect for our world that David speaks to regularly. 

What is your favorite David Attenborough moment!?

marie-samuels:

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Trouble in Paradise (Lubitsch, 1932)

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originally posted on January 06, 2014

marie-samuels:

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The Wolf of Wall Street (Scorsese, 2013) / Oh… Rosalinda!! (Powell & Pressburger, 1955)

marie-samuels:

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The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (Powell/Pressburger, 1943)

Cary Grant in Big Brown Eyes (1936)

idlesuperstar:

Hitchcock said that Waltzes from Vienna was ‘the lowest ebb of his career’. Admittedly, he said it to Truffaut in the middle of all the Auteur bobbins, so he was probably playing it down, as it’s not full of Hitch tropes, but really, I think it’s because he reputedly didn’t like working with Jessie Matthews. We’ve all had things we’ve done that are actually good but the process was horrible so we have bad memories. Also, he’d yet to make Family Plot, so really, give me a ‘lesser’ early one any day. 

If there’s one thing I’ve learnt in this life from being an Orson Welles obsessive, it’s to take anything directors say in interviews with a shovelful of salt. All this is to say that despite hating Strauss, (oh, how I have suffered through a lot of it due to Anton Walbrook), I actually enjoyed this film quite a lot. If you’re expecting a classic Hitchcock, or a Jessie Matthews vehicle, you’ll be disappointed. But if you fancy a rather comic little film about how Strauss wrote The Blue Danube, full of nice little moments of fun, as well as a lot of baking and girls in underwear (see, it IS a Hitch film) it’s well worth an hour or so of your time.

You get Esmond Knight being alternately mopey and enthusiastic as young Strauss, all free-roaming hair and lovely voice. You get Edmund Gwenn being uncharacteristically unpleasant as Strauss senior, worst dad in Vienna. You also get great comic turns from Frank Vosper (previously only known by me as the man with too much brilliantine in his hair in The Man Who Knew Too Much) as the hot-tempered Prince, and - my new favourite minor Hitch character - Hindle Edgar as Leopold, the jealous baker. He’s ace. 

Jessie Matthews has the thankless role of the girl demanding that Strauss choose between her and baking and his music (mmm, emotional blackmail) but Fay Compton as the Countess is very good. And it is of course more than competently directed by Hitch, with pace and some great cutting, and an excellent understanding of what to do with the music in a film - it’s obvious that in many scenes he’s cut the film to the music, and not the other way round, as the rhythm of the shots is marvellous.

soloses:

the a in lgbtqa should stand for allies, they deserve the recognition for defeating the axis powers and winning world war 2

Colour footage of Britain in 1926.

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idlesuperstar:

Dark Horse: An Alec Guinness Archive  is another excellent Archive On Four programme. (Forgive the late rec - there’s only two days left on the iplayer - I’ve only just listened myself). It’s basically an audio biography, full of archive interviews with Alec, friends and colleagues. A fascinating hour’s listen.

idlesuperstar:

Dark Horse: An Alec Guinness Archive  is another excellent Archive On Four programme. (Forgive the late rec - there’s only two days left on the iplayer - I’ve only just listened myself). It’s basically an audio biography, full of archive interviews with Alec, friends and colleagues. A fascinating hour’s listen.

chronic-mastication:

Hot toddy appreciation : 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9

According to wikipedia (yeah, I know), a Hot Maggie is a type of Hot Toddy made with Earl Grey Tea and Grand Marnier. I like all Hot Toddies, but a Hot Maggie sounds like it kicks all other Hot Toddy butt.

My Favorite hot toddies:

Hot Powers

This was served to me at a pub in Dublin.  It used Powers whiskey, but you can substitute any Irish whiskey and still be legit:

2 ounces of Powers, a slice of lemon with a few cloves stuck into it, a couple of teaspoons of sugar or for extra class, sugar cubes.  Put that stuff in a glass mug, and fill with hot water. 

Hot buttered Rum

Get fucked up the Pilgrim way!  2 ounces rum, 1 tsp of butter, a couple of teaspoons of sugar.  Put ye olde stuff in a mug and fill it with hot water.  

Milky Joe’s Coco Loco Winter Warmer

2 ounces rum, 1 tablespoon coconut manna or coconut butter (do not use coconut oil!)1 tablespoon coconut palm sugar or coconut blossom sugar Put ingredients in a mug or a hollowed out coconut, fill with hot water.  Sit back and contemplate getting layers cut into your hair.

Priney’s Hot Punch

Modified version of the the Prince Regent’s favorite punch recipe.

1 ounce rum, 1 ounce brandy, 1 ounce port, 1 teaspoon of sugar, piece of lemon peel, twisted and squeezed so that the oil comes to the surface.  Throw all this into a royal mug and fill it with hot water.  Sink me, but that’s delicious.