kasinski:

 Witness for the Prosecution (1957): Charles Laughton, Marlene Dietrich, Tyrone Power and Billy Wilder

kasinski:

Witness for the Prosecution (1957): Charles Laughton, Marlene Dietrich, Tyrone Power and Billy Wilder

Anton Walbrook - Strike Another Match
46 plays

tea-with-theo:

But you have to learn,
before you burn your fingers

Strike another match…

bbcradio3:

What a splendid picture. What a splendid cast! For Shakespeare’s 383rd birthday, members of the Old Vic Theatre Company appearing in Richard II at the New Theatre, London, recorded their production for a BBC Third Programme transmission on this day in 1947. In the studio, left to right, George Ralph (Duke of York); Alec Guinness (King Richard); Nicholas Hannen (Earl of Northumberland); Margaret Leighton (Queen); Ralph Richardson (John of Gaunt) and Harry Andrews (Henry Bolingbroke). Listen to Sunday’s 450th birthday production of ‘Antony and Cleopatra’, with Alex Kingston and Kenneth Branagh, on the Radio 3 web site, from anywhere in the world in 320K HD Sound, for the next four days.

bbcradio3:

What a splendid picture. What a splendid cast! For Shakespeare’s 383rd birthday, members of the Old Vic Theatre Company appearing in Richard II at the New Theatre, London, recorded their production for a BBC Third Programme transmission on this day in 1947. In the studio, left to right, George Ralph (Duke of York); Alec Guinness (King Richard); Nicholas Hannen (Earl of Northumberland); Margaret Leighton (Queen); Ralph Richardson (John of Gaunt) and Harry Andrews (Henry Bolingbroke). Listen to Sunday’s 450th birthday production of ‘Antony and Cleopatra’, with Alex Kingston and Kenneth Branagh, on the Radio 3 web site, from anywhere in the world in 320K HD Sound, for the next four days.

Noooooooooooo! That sound you heard was my screech of pain at you joining the Hiddles wagon. :p Do you know what you'll be tagging those posts with?

fookyeahconradveidt:

cinemaocd:

cinemaocd:

Well it’s been looming in the back ground as inevitability for a while now.  I’ve been posting a lot of Hiddles in tweed on my tweed blog.  I’m going to watch The Hollow Crown soon as it on streaming services now.  Henry V in the mud…

Oh to answer your question, maybe “inevitable bandwagon.”  Are you asking so you can catch them or tumblr savior them out?

My congratulations at having become a member of what I think of as the "WTF Am I, 13?!" Club. *pats Jenny’s shoulder reassuringly* It’s survivable. Barely. FWIW, i use, “twh” so Steph can Tumblr Savior those posts. It was the most unobtrusive tag I could come up with.

And amazingly enough—since I’ve got it downloaded and everything—I have yet to watch Henry V all the way through. (Henry IV, however, I’ve watched several times, most recently with le bf, who liked it.) I like to tell myself that this is evidence of having self-control, when it really is just spectacularly poor time management skills.

"WTF Am I 13?" Is the feeling I have continually on tumblr. Thanks for the support.   Ah well, I let you know when I watch them.  I’m so behind on movies and I keep getting/buying more it’s ridiculous. 

notjustamaninahat:

In honor of William Shakespeare’s birthday, images from Jeremy Northam’s two stage appearances in works by The Bard. 

The top photo is from the 1989-90 National Theatre production of Hamlet, in which Jeremy played Osric, then Laertes, while understudying the title role. He quite famously filled in numerous times first for Daniel Day-Lewis and then for Ian Charleson when illness kept each man from finishing the production’s run.

The bottom photo is from the 1993-94 Royal Shakespeare Company production of Love’s Labour’s Lost, in which Jeremy played Berowne. Often called the “Brideshead Revisited” production of the play, it was set in 1914 and ended with the sound of explosions in the distance to suggest the start of WWI. 

(See the captions for photo credits and costars)

To all the Tumblr users who tend to use tags very liberally:

thejadedkiwano:

Let’s play a game.

Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.

you, also, what, when, why, how, look, because, never

Strange Report Spamarama Vol. 2: Heart ‘no choice for the donor’

image

The episode begins with an extra, an interview with Robert Hardy, talking about his friendship with Anthony Quayle.  *BRB crying*  He talks about how when Quayle directed him at Stratford, Tony once drove him down to London so that Hardy could visit his girlfriend.  Aww BB.  What a sweet heart.  Then Robert goes on to talk about how Tony was working on his autobiography when he found out he was dying, but just kept going and wrote a chapter about how he was dying.  OK now I’m actually crying dammit, Hardy.

image

Cold open: a villain with a wicked comb-over and more than the full compliment of smug looks, talks a British Tennis pro into emigrating to his island paradise somewhere in the vicinity of Greece, but that is DEFINITELY NOT GREECE, OK.  Turns out comb-over was a shill for the local dictator and OH NOES Tennis pro is now the unwitting donor in a heart transplant operation being carried out in a mansion by some dudes with fabulous white surgical go-go rain boot thingies, one of whom is Robert Hardy.

Theme song.  This is my favorite still of Adam from the title sequence.  image

See how is pencil coordinates with his sofa and creates a striking visual counterpoint to his blue suit and avocado green everything else?  Yes.  Good.  On to the episode.

image

Adam gets out of his cab, carrying a pair of boots.He  sees Ham and Evelyn who are just leaving on the motorbike.  Turns out the boots were just back from being repaired.  Ham is taking Evelyn to some art collector’s house to sell a painting.  Ham is headed for lunch with “old Marxy” his pathologist friend.  They are going to talk about autopsies.  Fun.  Adam goes inside where he is startled by Mrs. Roberts, a potential client. 

image

Colonel Brighton will judge you but Adam Strange will hit you with his boot. Mrs. Roberts’ husband is a heart surgeon who was been kidnapped.  Mrs. Roberts leaves and we cut to Ham and Old Marxy.  Old Marxy is just finishing an autopsy on the tennis pro from the cold open.  Oh hai, there relevant info.  The tennis pro’s body was found burned in a stolen car, but there is evidence that he’d recently had heart surgery. 

image

Back at the pad Adam is running some chemistry tests on the ransom note, like you do.  Look at that awesome blue gas jet, though.  Sigh.  Where was I?  Ham lets drop about his autopsy lunch date of plot-related information and Adam puts the missing heart surgeon together with the surgically altered body.  Evelyn casually asks Adam on a date to the opera and Adam casually, somewhat dickishly turns her down.  Perhaps to make up for it, he agrees to buy her painting which he clearly doesn’t like, but pretends to because he’s dadlike and patronizing, in case you didn’t get that already. For some reason Evelyn has to leave because they are doing some science, so you know, DUDES ONLY. 

Ham goes home to get ready for a hot date.  It turns out he has a dog named “Minnesota.” He is also shirtless.  This is entirely relevant to the plot.

image

Adam and Ham figure out that the evil dictator of the country that is definitely NOT GREECE arrived in England and never left and is probably still there being treated for a heart condition.  They do this by standing really close together and using magnifying glasses.  Seriously, tho, I think they are engaged after that scene.

image

Evelyn returns with the painting, which is fugly and then Adam makes a scintillating phone call to America that will cost him “seven or eight pounds.”  (Ahh the seventies.)  At least he wears his glasses.image

Ham goes to check out the dead tennis pro’s bedsit which is for rent.  But the landlady won’t rent to another young man because the tennis pro was such a pig.  One of the dictator’s henchmen shows up at the bedsit after Ham leaves. Evelyn goes to the bedsit and does some top level spying, stealing old cigar butts from the room.  The landlady phones the henchman after she leaves.  Oh NOES!

Ham and Adam see one of Evelyn’s friends hanging around in the hallway.  No one has seen Evelyn all day.  Adam, smashes in the door with his newly repaired boot.  Badass.  Then Ham rushes in and we get to see that Evelyn has an amazing collection of Midcentury Scandinavian enamelware. 

image

Robert Hardy tries to get away from the bad guys.  They are looking for another “donor” for the dictator who is hours away from certain death. 

image

Evelyn is questioned by the bad guys and then they lock in a room with no art supplies and no midcentury knicknacks.  Clearly she needs to get the fuck outta there now.

image

But she doesn’t make it and she ends up in Robert Hardy’s room which seems like it might get spicy, but doesn’t. 

Adam and Ham hatch a scheme to rescue Evelyn, by making Ham the bait, turning him overnight into a media darling and prime candidate for unwitting heart donation.  It involves him swimming the English channel or something, IDK.  It’s an excuse for Adam to wear an anorak and Ham to wear almost nothing.image

The bad guys come to Ham’s bedsit and they try to lure him into emigrating to TOTALLY NOT GREECE.  They discuss Minnesota, which according to the henchman, is the “land of 1,000 lakes.”  And Ham totally lets this mistake slide and I legit don’t know whether he was trying to play it cool or whether the writers were off by a factor of ten re: number of lakes in MN. 

The bad guys kidnap Ham, and the police and Adam follow, but get cut off by a hay wagon.  The bad guys get away down a side road that is supposedly closed for repairs.  Scotland Yard were just out-witted by a Hong Kong Fooey level trick.  Thankfully due to one of the cops’ superior knowledge of the local road system, and a couple of scintillating map reading scenes, Adam makes it to the mansion in time to prevent Ham from becoming hamburger (geddit?) on the operating table.  Adam karate chops a guy out of the way to get to Ham, bringing the number of action scenes up to three in this episode if you count kicking in the door and almost hitting a woman with a shoe. image

image

Just in the nick of time!

image

THE END

mizoguchi:

Omar Sharif in his debut film Struggle in the Valley/Sira` Fi al-Wadi (Youssef Chahine - 1954)

kawaii-i:

omg :O want!!!

kawaii-i:

omg :O want!!!

robertdonats-stage:

Robert Donat at the age of 18, as he appeared as Orlando in As You Like It.

robertdonats-stage:

Robert Donat at the age of 18, as he appeared as Orlando in As You Like It.

idlesuperstar:

tea-with-theo: #that one time anton went for the private detective film noir look#i can totally picture him investigating like a boss#and looking fab all the time#even when being in a fight with the bad guys#his hair would always be glorious#the viennese falcon#a lost film